News, features, work-in-progress, etc.

Welcome to my blog. Here, I'll attempt to upload all my new original oil paintings, works-in-progress, techniques, ideas, and all the latest merchandise and apparel with my designs on them. Plus anything else I can think of.

Signup to at the bottom of the page to receive all the latest posts.

Step & Repeat, No. 4

80 x 40 x 2cm
Oil on linen canvas wrap-around

Description

What an unimaginative title for this series? Well, at least it says what it is!

If you've ever use a software program, such as Quark XPress, InDesign, Photoshop, etc. they have a feature whereby you can select an object, duplicate it, and then place it in a given location. 

I haven't exactly done this with these designs, but it did come to mind whilst thinking of a title for them. Because I have taken a small element from a previous painting, and repeated it to create an interesting, repetative design.

By rotating or flipping the element, and moving it around, I often find that it can fit nicely together with the copied element, which then creates interesting designs that I would never have come up with without doing this. It doesn't always work, but when it does, it's quite exciting.

The element for this one was taken from Swirl Lake.

Wall view

Step & Repeat, No. 4

Angle view

Edge view

Corner view

Traverse

Traverse

DESIGN

I'm not entirely happy with the lines that cross over each other on the right hand side. It looked okay as a sketch, so it wasn't until I started adding the colour that I noticed it. 

I tried several things to tone down the lines that run underneath, but nothing really worked. I think it's alright as it is, but I will modify it for another painting.

 

COLOURS

I love this green! I stumbled across it by accident when I ran out of my Winsor & Newton Sap Green. I thought I would try Michael Harding's version instead, but when it arrived, and I squeezed some out, I was shocked at how dark it was.

I needed to lighten it, so I added some white. Wow, I didn't expect such a lovely green tone. The only worry was how much will it alter over time now that I've had to add white to it. I used M. Graham's Titanium White (non-alkyd), which is made with walnut oil, so it should be okay, because walnut isn't supposed to yellow as much as traditional linseed oil.

Adding white to a transparent colour will make it more opaque, but that didn't matter with this painting. Theoretically, you could use a zinc white to preserve the transparency, but I find that it still gives the colour a milky appearance, which you get when you add an opaque white. It's much better to find the right transparent color to begin with, such as the W&N Sap Green. 

Also, it scares me using too much zinc because it is advisable to only use it in the final layer as it has a tendency to dry to a brittle film, which is vulnerable to cracking.

Edge view

SURFACE

This was an interesting experiment. It's an alluminium panel specially made for acrylic and oil paintings, meaning that it has a ground applied to it to absorb the paint. 

I enjoyed working on it, mainly because it's so smooth - there isn't a tooth pattern that can steer your brush off course. But there were some issues that makes me unsure if I want use it regularly. I think most of these issues are related to the ground that they have used. It would be interesting to add my own top of it, or just a layer of paint, before I start working on it.

Click here to read a more in depth review

Prints of this painting are available here

Applying first layer